PRESS REVIEW - September 5/11, 2020

This is Money

A diet rich in vegetables could remove 16 years’ worth of emissions

This is the result of a recent study conducted by New York University, which shows how a shift in our diets from meat and dairy consumption to plant-based foodstuffs such as beans, lentils and nuts could remove 16 years’ worth of CO2 emissions by 2050. The researchers have estimated that the fact that these plants absorb large amounts of CO2 could also allow us to convert land use. 

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FAO / AllAfrica

Locust outbreaks threaten Southern Africa

According to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), locusts are threatening the food security and livelihoods of millions of people, in Central Africa at first and now in Botswana, Namibia, Zambia and Zimbabwe. Around 7 million people in the four affected countries are still struggling with the effects of the drought of 2019 and with the economic impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic. This could be another disaster that could lead to food and nutrition insecurity. 

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Bloomberg

Beyond Meat to build a production facility in China

U.S. producer Beyond Meat is building two production facilities in China’s eastern province of Zhejiang. The facility will be built near Shanghai and is expected to start production in the next few months, with full scale-production set to begin in early 2021. The “fake meat” producer will therefore start trading with the Asian market. 

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The Guardian

Only 4% of Africa’s Great Green Wall has been completed

Only 4% of the Great Green Wall of Africa, the reforestation project aimed at replanting large areas of Central Africa, has been completed. The Great Green Wall should help to halt the advance of the Sahara desert. However, according to the researchers, more funds, greater technical support and tighter oversight will be needed if the plan to plant 100 million hectares of trees and shrubs is to be implemented. 

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The Guardian

Cutting air pollution in cities improves people’s health

According to the European Environment Agency, cutting air pollution and improving green spaces in cities would immediately improve the health of the poorest people in society. In a report, the Agency explains that environmental factors cause greater harm to the health of people living in poverty. 

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