PRESS REVIEW - SEPTEMBER 11/17, 2021

Food Navigator

Farm to fork strategy takes another step towards becoming legally binding

94 members of the ENVI and AGRI committees (dealing with the environment and agricultural production) voted in favor of the report on the European Commission's Farm to Fork strategy. 20 members voted against and 10 abstained. The resolution will now go to the Parliament to be voted on in the coming weeks. 

Read all

South China Morning

Hong Kong children and the forest planted to reduce the heat

Children from the Tai Po school in Hong Kong will follow the “Miyawaki method”, which involves planting native species on small plots of public land to reduce summer temperatures and freshen the urban environment. The project will also serve to protect and improve the city’s biodiversity. 

Read all

Evening Standard

Permanent food shortages in the United Kingdom

Ian Wright, chief executive of the Food and Drink Federation, warned that supply problems affecting UK supermarkets could worsen due to a shortage of half a million food workers. In fact, stocks of beer, chicken and other widely consumed food products are starting to run out 

Read all

The Straits Times

IUCN votes to protect 80% of the Amazon forest

Amazon tribes, environmentalists, scientists and diplomats have voted in favor of a motion to protect 80 percent of the rain forest by 2025. The resolution passed at the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) congress in Marseilles aims to safeguard the Amazon rain forest and put indigenous communities at the center of conservation efforts. 

Read all

All Africa

FAO calls for greater focus on food crises

The number of people affected by food crises has continued to grow over the past 5 years, reaching 155 million people in 55 countries in 2020. FAO says that more than 41 million people are currently facing emergency levels of food insecurity and risk famine unless they receive immediate assistance. 

Read all

The Guardian

Protests in Italy due to the expansion of vineyards for Prosecco production

Centuries-old trees have been felled over a couple of weeks to make way for the production of more Prosecco, the best-selling Italian wine in the world. This has led to many protests by citizens claiming that the growing number of vineyards have not only damaged the environment, but are putting people's health at risk. The Prosecco hills have recently been included in the UNESCO list of world heritage sites. 

Read all

This website uses profiling cookies, including third-party ones, to send you advertising and offer you services which reflect the preferences you have shown during browsing. If you continue to browse the website by accessing any area or selecting any element of it (such as an image or a link), you consent to use of cookies.
Click on the following link to view our extended cookie policy, which provides a description of the categories present and the links with the personal data policies of the third-party processors. You can also decide which cookies to authorise or whether to deny consent for all or only certain cookies.   Continues