PRESS REVIEW - OCTOBER 31/NOVEMBER 5, 2020

World Economic Forum

How much plastic is there on the ocean bed?

Scientists estimate there may be around 14.4 million tons of microplastics on the sea bed, according to new research. The results show that there is more than double the amount of plastic on the sea floor than on the surface of the water.  

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All Africa

The pandemic is making life hard for Kenyan farmers

According to a study conducted by Agricultural Policy Research in Africa, most small Kenyan farmers have no access to agricultural inputs and markets, which jeopardizes the availability of food in the country. According to the study, 23 to 30 percent of respondents said they had scaled down their activity due to COVID-19. 

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Bloomberg

India is the world’s biggest sugar consumer but wants to increase consumption

To increase domestic demand and reduce the excess supply that cannot compete with international markets, a massive communication campaign is underway in India to increase sugar consumption. Nutritionists to endocrinologists, public health experts to doctors, argue that sugar is the necessary fuel for cells. This despite the fact that consumption is among the highest in the world. 

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Metro UK

Big predators of the sea can help save the planet

Sharks, tuna and other big fish are excellent carbon sinks and serve to sequester large amounts of greenhouse gases. A recent study explains why we need to reduce the catch to allow big fish to end their life in the ocean and thus help curb global warming. 

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Bloomberg

Climate risk ends up in court

A young Australian scientist, Mark McVeigh, is suing his pension fund for failing to adequately disclose or assess the impact of climate change on his investments. His legal action could have numerous implications, including financial, and push large investment funds to divert their investments towards a sustainable economy. 

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This is Money

A tax on meat to reduce pandemics

Scientists have warned in a study that, unless bold action is taken to halt the destruction of habitats, pandemics will emerge more often, spread faster, cost more and kill more people than COVID-19. Particularly as regards the intensive breeding of poultry, pigs and cattle. 

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