PRESS REVIEW - JUNE 29 / JULY 5 2019

ASIA One

Thailand aims to become the largest producer of organic rice

The Ministry of Agriculture, in cooperation with the Ministry of Commerce, is encouraging farmers and traders to produce quality organic rice that meets the requirements of international standards. The Asian country is already a market leader and sees the growing demand for organic rice as an opportunity to become an international production hub for this cereal. 

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USA Today

Vegan-friendly menus are sprouting up in U.S. restaurant chains

This is an ever-growing trend, especially in U.S. fast-food chains. In fact, the number of restaurants offering customers vegetarian or vegan options is increasing. This a clear indication that companies such as Beyond Meat and Impossible Foods are establishing themselves on the market. Chains such as Burger King, Del Taco, Shake Shack, Red Robin, Blaze Pizza and Qdoba Mexican Eats have joined this trend. Plant-based foods sales have grown by 17% in the past year to over $3.7 billion. 

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Reuters

China could become the next leader in climate targets

Following the defection of the USA and European uncertainty, China leads the way at the G20 with a view to strengthening commitments to reduce CO2 emissions and achieve climate targets. According to many analysts, the Asian giant could introduce new and stricter targets for reducing greenhouse gases by next year. 

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Daily Nation / AllAfrica

Over 2 million people at risk of starvation in Kenya

More than two million Kenyans are experiencing a severe food crisis due to the effects of the drought that has hit the country, leading to rising foodstuff prices. Wheat reserves are decreasing: with less than a million tons remaining, stocks are expected to run out in just two weeks. Out of the country’s 47 counties, Turkana, Marsabit, Baringo (East Pokot), Wajir, Garissa, Tana river and Isiolo will be the most affected. 

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Al Jazeera

Rising temperatures will lead to the loss of 80 million jobs

This was revealed in a recent research conducted by the United Nations International Labor Organisation, which predicts that a temperature rise of 1.5 °C by the end of the century could lead to a 2.2 percent drop in working hours, equal to 80 million full-time jobs. This would cost the global economy $2.4 trillion. 

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