PRESS REVIEW - JUNE 28/ JULY 2, 2021

FAO

Education is a key lifeline for world’s forests

Forest education, from primary schools to universities, is insufficient in many countries of the world, according to the results of a global survey led by FAO. According to the survey, more must be done to improve forest education in many parts of the world While forest education has evolved and the number, diversity and qualifications of graduates have increased in most regions, forest education resources are insufficient or limited in large parts of the global South.

Read all

The Guardian

School meals at risk in UK due to lack of haulage drivers

The pandemic and Brexit have caused a shortage of truck drivers in the UK. The estimated loss of 100,000 truck drivers could leave schools without meals due to a lack of food supplies. School cooks would be supplied with two days’ worth of standby frozen ingredients if the supply chain were disrupted.

Read all

All Africa

Uganda joins Clean Seas campaign

Launched by the UN Environment Programme in 2017, the campaign contributes to the goals of the Global Partnership on Marine Litter to prevent and reduce marine litter and plastic pollution. The signatory countries cover 60% of the world’s coasts, with a growing membership from countries like Uganda that are working to protect other water bodies.

Read all

Washington Post

Drought in Madagascar is causing hunger for 400,000 people

The United Nations World Food Program says southern Madagascar is grappling with a severe drought that is pushing 400,000 people towards starvation. The WFP regional director for Southern Africa said it was a dramatic and desperate situation. The United Nations and the government of Madagascar are appealing for around $155 million in a few days to provide life-saving food and prevent a severe famine, she said.

Read all

This is Money

Climate change threatens indigenous food systems

From the Arctic to the Amazon, indigenous communities' traditional food harvesting techniques are threatened by accelerating climate change and economic pressures. The food systems used by the various indigenous peoples have been found to be among the most sustainable in the world in terms of efficiency, avoiding waste and adapting to the seasons.

Read all

South China Morning Post

The Mediterranean diet promotes brain health and reduces the risk of dementia

The Mediterranean diet is better than previously thought because it helps minimize the buildup of two proteins that can trigger dementia. A recent study which explains that this could be due to the fact that the diet reduces inflammation.

Read all

This website uses profiling cookies, including third-party ones, to send you advertising and offer you services which reflect the preferences you have shown during browsing. If you continue to browse the website by accessing any area or selecting any element of it (such as an image or a link), you consent to use of cookies.
Click on the following link to view our extended cookie policy, which provides a description of the categories present and the links with the personal data policies of the third-party processors. You can also decide which cookies to authorise or whether to deny consent for all or only certain cookies.   Continues